Cabaret

DramaWatch Weekly: Rumor has it

Day of the Dead, day of the cabaret, day of the All Jane Comedy Festival (plus another episode of YouTubinator)

Is Milagro Theatre downsizing, moving or closing?

A.L. Adams

Nope, says Producing Creative Director Roy Antonio Arauz, but he can see why people are asking. While their annex space, El Zocalo, has been undergoing accessibility upgrades, their boarded-up front windows have been beset by spraypaint and wayward fliers, making them deceptively appear shut-down.

But don’t fret! Portland’s longest-running Latino theater is gearing up as usual for its annual highlight: a Dia de Muertos play that always wraps a new theme around the sacred and sensorially rich traditions of the fall holiday. It opens next week and continues through mid November. ‘Til then, ignore the unfortunate window dressing.

“Exodo,” Milagro Theatre’s 22nd annual Day of the Dead spectacular, opens Oct. 20. Photo: Russell J Young

Here in the ArtsWatch theater department, further rumors abound: that (according to Bobby Bermea) Shaking the Tree’s Samantha Van Der Merwe is a magician, that (via TJ Acena) Artists Rep’s trying to mess with our minds. According to Deann Welker, Lost in Midair is the real deal, and if you ask Bob Hicks, the Portland Civic Theatre Guild has had a lot going on for a long time. Read all about it.

Oh! And even though I missed season 1, I heard Season 2 of Joel Patrick Durham’s horror serial Nesting: Vacancy might be worth looking into. Who was saying that? Oh, right: its actors. Well, maybe they would know. Here at ArtsWatch, Hailey Bachrach is vouching.

Lakewood Theatre’s Cabaret  closes this weekend, looking clean and cheesy in counterpoint to this summer’s Broadway Portland offering, which felt credibly dark and sleazy. (How much realness do you want from strippers and Nazis? It’s negotiable.) One thing fans of this musical ought to stop not knowing, is that downtown Portland has a real-life Kit Kat Club. Mere blocks from the Keller, its existence recently rendered Broadway Portland’s poetic PR pitch “We welcome you to the Kit Kat Club…” downright confusing to high/low arts amphibians like me. Hedging my bets, I attended both events, finding surprising similarities: Each Kit Kat had a glittery, mischievous emcee; each featured winky burlesque and wobbling flesh. In each, the writer was quickly befriended by a sly businessman with a hidden agenda. But at only one of the parallel Kit Kats did I witness dancers doing carnival strongman feats, including The Bed of Nails and The Crushing of One’s Fingers under a Tin Can—and believe it or not, that was on the small stage. All of which is to say: Cabaret the musical closes this weekend at Lakewood, probably sans can-crushing but with plenty of satiny pizazz. Cabaret the concept continues, probably forever.

Now let’s be naughty and play the little game we love, but PR people so often hate: Let’s YouTube search some more performers! In my experience, comedians are the most cool with that anyway, and luckily, this weekend dozens are coming. I’ll race you to the YouTubinator!

First up, searching Amber Ruffin yields a deep trove of video treasure. As a staff writer on Late Night with Seth Meyers she frequently appears in recurring bits like “Amber Says What,” “Amber’s Minute of Fury,” and “Jokes Seth Can’t Tell.” Here she is recapping the 2016 Olympics in a single word, and here she is flipping her wig in defense of a congresswoman.  And just watch the next twenty or so clips that come up. I did.

Well, shoot. If we do this for all 48 acts from All Jane Comedy Festival, we’ll be at it until it’s over. Just go to these shows. They start tonight.

Laura Sams candidly takes one of 48 slots at the All Jane Comedy Festival Oct. 11-15.

 

 

 

 

‘Cabaret’: the darkness behind the razzle-dazzle

Unlike the current stage revival, Bob Fosse's film made evil real by making the political personal

Last week’s production in Portland conclusively demonstrates just what a work of dark genius Cabaret is.

No, not the popular Broadway road show that Broadway in Portland brought to Keller Auditorium last week. Sure, this third major incarnation of the venerable show, Roundabout Theatre Company’s production of Sam Mendes and Rob Marshall’s Tony Award-winning production, boasts some catchy tunes, powerful source material, a still-fascinating concept — using the cabaret setting to both contrast with and comment on the rise of Nazism in inter-World War Germany. And given the alarming rise in neo-Nazi rhetoric and power (including one of the US President’s closest advisors and a significant part of his power base) and resurgent homophobia (anti-gay laws from Russia to Uganda to Arizona to murders in Orlando), it has renewed relevance.

But beset by shoddy casting, acting, and singing and a flawed book, if the current road show was the only version of the immortal Kander & Ebb musical you’d ever seen, you’d wonder why the show has lasted half a century.

Even the orchestra is beautiful in the current road show of ‘Cabaret.’

No, as renowned as the original musical and this long-running Mendes-Marshall revival (which upon its 1993 debut scored a huge financial success, snapped up its own slew of Tonys, and sparked several re-revivals including this one) were, it’s the second major version, the 1972 film version of Cabaret, directed by Bob Fosse, that will stand as one of the great artistic creations of the 20th century, one still relevant today. And the differences between what happened onstage last week at the Keller and what appeared onscreen 45 years ago reveal the kinds of tough artistic choices that transform a work of art from good to genius.

Continues…

DanceWatch Weekly: Choreography XX in the park

Oregon Ballet Theatre makes for Washington Park, the last Spectacle Garden, the Improvisation Summit, more!

Over the last couple of weeks I have been a lucky, lucky fly on the wall at Oregon Ballet Theatre, watching the making of three new ballets by three, extremely talented women choreographers—Nicole Haskins, Helen Simoneau, and Gioconda Barbuto, the winners of the company’s Choreography XX competition. An initiative created by OBT artistic director Kevin Irving to discover new female ballet choreographers, Choreography XX attracted 91 applicants from across North America, and three were selected to create new ballets for the company.

Because I am curious about the direction that classical ballet is headed and how it relates to the the changing world at large, and the differences in how women lead/direct/choreograph verses men, I asked if I could sit in on the rehearsals and watch and write about it. It was an awesome experience.

Over the first three weeks I spoke with the choreographers about their artistic processes and what they thought about the dearth of women choreographers in ballet. I also sat down with OBT artistic director Kevin Irving to hear about his future vision for the company. You can read Simoneau’s interview here, Haskins interview here, and Irving and Barbuto’s interview here.

In watching rehearsals I was pleasantly surprised by the lack of limitations in what was being created and the borrowing of movement concepts from the modern dance world. I was also surprised at the amount of experimentation that was being asked of the dancers—and how open and comfortable they were with that process. I think being a part of the making process of a dance creates a different relationship between the dancer and the choreography, one that the dancers are much more invested in.

I felt that each choreographer’s way of speaking and the energy each emitted, created a different environment in the studio. That in turn created the environment within the dance. The choices around language, music, the steps, the attack, the imagery, the energy, the focus, and the costumes, are all aspects of who the choreographer is, and it is all reflected in the dance.

I noticed that each choreographer emphasized relationships within their choreography, and that the partnering models moved away from the typical male-female ballet partnering to include same-sex partnerships for both men and women. Also the expectations of what women could do physically within the partnering was altered because of the introduction of contemporary dance partnering principles, which see men and women as equals in physical ability. Seeing women lifting and supporting other women in ballet is new for me.

I also noticed a shared theme of group connection and how the whole group is affected when one person moves. At some point in each piece, the dancers gather and connect in a circular, amoeba-like group, try and move across the room together, and are affected by each other.

Watching these three pieces unfold over the last four weeks has been a completely enlivening experience and has reiterated that the road to successful choreography is about getting into the studio often, getting out of your own way, and letting “mistakes” happen.

Performances this week

OBT dancers Jacqueline Straughan and Martina Chavez in rehearsals for Gioconda Barbuto’s new work for OBT’s Choreography XX, presented June 29 ­ 30th, 2017 at the Washington Park Rose Garden Amphitheater. Photo by Yi Yin.

Choreography XX
World premiers by Gioconda Barbuto, Nicole Haskins, and Helen Simoneau
Oregon Ballet Theatre
June 29-30
FREE
Washington Park Amphitheater, 410 SW Kingston Ave.
See above.
Because parking at the Washington Park Amphitheater is severely limited, TriMet is encouraging folks to take public transportation to OBT’s Choreography XX performance with this fun video featuring OBT2 dancers Erika Crawford and Daniel Salinas. Don’t forget to get there early to get a good seat.

Spectacle Garden 13: The End, hosted by Ben Martens , 7:30 pm June 30 at The Headwater Theatre, 55 NE Farragut St. Image by Cullen Siewert.

Spectacle Garden 13: The End
Hosted by Ben Martens
7:30 pm June 30
The Headwater Theatre, 55 NE Farragut St.

Sadly the spectacle is coming to an end. Ben Martens, who has been curating monthly performances at the Headwaters theatre for over a year now, is calling it quits. This monthly showcase has provided a free platform to experimental performers of all kinds to “work-it-out in real time, in front of a real live audience.” As far as I know, there isn’t another regular showcase of its kind in Portland, so Spectacle Garden will be greatly missed.

Spectacle Garden 13: The End, will be your last chance to catch some of Portland’s finest experimental artists under one roof. The program includes Natasha Kotey, Benja Farber, Elzza Doll, Katherine Rose, Simeon Jacobs, Ben Martens, Patrick McCulley, Laura Blake, Draven, Inclusive Arts Vibe Dance Company, and a sci-fi/music video By Port City’s Project Grow.

As always the evening will continue into the wee hours of the morning with the musical stylings of Amenta Abioto, Phil Stevens, Tig Bitty, and Angel 11.

Martens is a poet, electronic music producer, emcee, mover, organizer and performance artist with an interest in revolution, existentialism, comedy, mindfulness and environmentalism. He studied music and performance at Naropa University and has been studying Butoh with Mizu Desierto since his arrival in Portland in January 2015.

We look forward to future manifestations of Martens combined talents. Until then…dance on.

Wendy Whelan and Brian Brooks performing for a dress rehearsal at the Joyce Theater in Brian Brooks’ Some of a Thousand Words. Photo courtesy of Getty Images. Photo by Timothy A. Clary.

Restless Creature: Wendy Whelan-a film
A film starring former New York City Ballet principal dancer Wendy Whelan
June 30-July 6 daily 4:30, 8:20
Cinema 21, 616 NW 21st Ave.

This film, directed by Linda Saffire and Adam Schlesinger, is an intimate, emotional portrayal of prima ballerina Wendy Whelan as she prepares to leave New York City Ballet after dancing with the company for 30 years. In an interview with Vulture magazine online, Whelan spoke with former Oregon Ballet Theatre dancer Mia Leimkuhler, about retirement, sexism, and ageism in the ballet world, and about making the choice to shoot the film: “{…} I’m at a crossroads in the company, I don’t know where I’m going to end up.” {…} I didn’t feel in control of my emotions at the time, because so many emotions were coming and going. It was scary to say how I really felt. Sadness, anger, fear, shame. Those were the big words at the time, and I was feeling those for a couple of years. To expose these feelings in front of a camera felt so foreign. Ballerinas don’t show those things. Ever. That’s just not what we’re taught to do.”

Improvisation Summit of Portland 2017. Photo of Intisar Abioto, courtesy of Danielle Ross.

Improvisation Summit of Portland 2017
Curated by Danielle Ross
Hosted by The Creative Music Guild and Disjecta
June 30-July 1
Disjecta, 8371 N Interstate Ave.

Dance/Performance Lineup
Friday, June 30th
7 pm Andrea Kleine and Linda Austin
8:15 pm Danielle Ross, Lisa Schonberg and Heather Treadway

Saturday, July 1st
7:15 pm Carla Mann and Brandon Conway
8:15 pm Andrea Kleine’s Ships w/ Linda Austin, Catherine Egan, Taylor Eggan, Kaj Anne Pepper, Danielle Ross and Noelle Stiles
9:30 pm Amenta Abioto and Intisar Abioto

Opening Friday night, the Improvisation Summit of Portland 2017 will features select members of the Portland dance community in improvised pairings, curated by Portland dance artist Danielle Ross. Since its inception in 2012, the Improvisation Summit, a subset of the Creative Music Guild, has brought together dancers, musicians, filmmakers and other experimental artists to create improvised, one-of-a-kind performances. Ross is interested in shaking up the audience’s relationship with the performance space by introducing movement and by showing how different choreographers play with, and relate to sound. Check out Creative Music Guild’s website for the full list of artist bios and clicking on the artist name.

Jon Peterson as the Emcee and the national touring cast of Cabaret, at Keller Auditorium. Photo: Joan Marcus

Cabaret
Roundabout Theatre Company
Presented by U.S. Bank Broadway in Portland
June 27-July 2
Keller Auditorium, 222 SW Clay St.
In pre-war Germany, as the Nazis gain power, drama unfold between a young writer and Sally Bowles, a singer at the seedy Berlin nightclub called the Kit Kat Club. Nightlife is alluring, but dangerous, and times are uncertain. The Emcee, a ghoulish persona, tantalizes the crowd with his raucous, debauched performers, helping them to forget. In the musical’s final scene, as the Emcee is giving his Auf Wiedersehens, Sally Bowles says, “It’ll all work out, it’s only politics, what’s it got to do with us?”

Upcoming Performances

July
July 5, ARCOS studio showing, ARCOS Dance
July 6, Éowyn Emerald & Dancers
July 8, Ten Tiny Dances, Beaverton Farmers Market, Directed by Mike Barber
July 14-15, Rantum Skoot, Linda Austin, Gregg Bielemeier, Bob Eisen (NYC), and Sada Naegelin & Leah Wilmoth
July 14-16, Apparatus, by Danielle Ross
July 15, Rush Hour, Heidi Duckler Dance Theater Northwest
July 15, Pretty Creatives Showing, NW Dance Project
July 26, Movement and Flow: Portland Dance Films, Hosted by NW Film Center featuring films by Conrad Kazcor, Fuchsia Lin, Dylan Wilbur Media, Gabriel Shalom, Jackie Davis, and Amy Yang Chiao
July 29, Hafla, Portland Bellydance Guild
August
August 3-5, Galaxy Dance Festival, Hosted by Polaris Dance Theatre
August 11-13, JamBallah Northwest ’17, Hosted by JamBallah NW
August 24-September 6, Portland Dance Film Fest, Directed by Kailee McMurran, Tia Palomino, and Jess Evans
August 24-October 8, Kurios: Cabinet Of Curiosities, Cirque Du Soleil

ArtsWatch Weekly: making it work

You can help us keep the engine running; summer music festivals, "Cabaret" and "The Addams Family," "Baskerville" and more

We have a lot on our minds here at ArtsWatch this week, from the kickoff of the Chamber Music Northwest season to free ballet in the park to a chorus line of Broadway musicals. We’ll get to all of that, and more.

But first, we want to talk about something basic.

ArtsWatch has been here when you’ve needed coverage. Now we ask you to support our important work. Unlike many media outlets, we don’t operate behind a paywall. Everything we publish is freely available to you and anyone who wants to read it. That means we’re in a partnership with our readers, and to continue to grow and thrive we need your support.
It’s especially key right now, as coverage of the fine and performing arts in other media continues to drop dramatically. ArtsWatch has become the leading source for substantial, informed arts news that you don’t find anywhere else.
 If you’re an arts organization, you count on us to get your word out. If you’re a devoted follower of the arts, you count on us to know what’s going on. You count on us to begin and continue compelling conversations. ArtsWatch can’t continue to do that without your contributions.
ArtsWatch is a crucial part of the arts ecosystem in the community. You rely on ArtsWatch to provide vital feedback, smart and substantive coverage, validation for grants, marketing gold in quotes and links, and a way to keep yourselves and your audiences engaged and educated.
Now we ask for your help.
How can you support us? It’s simple.
  • Make a donation. Click this link to pay online or send us a check.
  • Buy an ad and promote your good work. Contact Laura Grimes at laura@orartswatch.org.
  • Give us a shout-out on social media, in your newsletters, and at your events.
EVERY donation and ad sponsorship goes to pay writers and editors for their professional time and effort. ArtsWatch is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization, and you may be able to deduct your charitable contribution from your taxes.
Thank you for giving us the opportunity to cover the vibrant arts community in Portland and throughout Oregon. Everyone at ArtsWatch is deeply grateful for all our readers and supporters.

 

With heartfelt thanks,

Barry Johnson
Bob Hicks
Brett Campbell
Laura Grimes
and all of our talented freelance writers

 


 

Oregon Ballet Theatre dancer Xuan Cheng in rehearsal for Giaconda Barbuto’s new work in “Choreography XX” at the Washington Park Rose Garden Amphitheater Thursday and Friday. Photo: Yi Yin

 

WHAT’S COMING UP THIS WEEK:

Continues…

DanceWatch Weekly: The Risk/Reward bargain

Risk/Reward's 10th anniversary festival highlights the week in dance

Usually a curator knows what an artist’s work is going to look like before it hits the stage, but in the case of the Risk/Reward Festival of New Performance, those creations aren’t revealed until opening night.

The festival, which opens Friday night at Artist Repertory Theatre and is directed by Jerry Tischleder, is interested in supporting the creative process more than the finished product. The end result is a selection of 20-minute works that break boundaries and new artistic ground, by merging together multiple genres of dance, music, theatre, performance art, film and more.

Celebrating its 10th anniversary this weekend, the festival will includes; a lobby film installation, karaoke, a post-show concert, and new performance works by well-known Portland choreographers Linda Austin and Pepper Pepper, alongside visiting artists Queen Shmooquan, Pam Tzeng, Kiana Harris, Shannon Stewart/Donal Mosher, and Coley Mixan.

What is the risk for the audience? There isn’t one. Especially not monetarily. Because this year, all tickets are pay-what-you-will, for the entire festival.

The reward, in my opinion, is that we (the audience) are not being “sold” on what to expect from the performances, because the presenter doesn’t know what the artists are presenting ahead of time. In today’s world where we are constantly being bombarded with marketing for things to buy, I find this approach to be a reprieve.

Also in Portland dance this week, visiting Pakistani Bharatanatyam dancer Amna Mawaz Khan will perform in Theatre Wallay at Artists Repertory Theater and give a performance and talk Tuesday night at New Expressive Works about living life “underground” as a Bharatanatyam dancer in Pakistan. For you musical theatre buffs, Roundabout Theatre Company’s Cabaret is here on tour from New York, and for ballet lovers, Sleeping Beauty is brought back to life by the students of June Taylor’s School of Dance.

Plus…lots of sun. Enjoy it all!

Performances this week

Risk/Reward Festival Of New Performance, June 23-24. Photo of Linda Austin Dance courtesy of Risk/Reward.

Risk/Reward Festival Of New Performance
Participating artists: Linda Austin Dance, Queen Shmooquan, Pam Tzeng, Pepper Pepper, Kiana Harris, Shannon Stewart/Donal Mosher, and Coley Mixan
Produced by Jerry Tischleder
June 23-24
Artist Repertory Theatre, Alder Stage, 1515 SW Alder St.
See above.

Bharatanatyam dancer Amna Mawaz Khan. Photo courtesy of New Expressive Works.

Amna Mawaz Khan-Lecture and Bharatnatyam dance performance
Presented by Subashini Ganesan/New Expressive Works in partnership with Linda Alper of Artist Repertory Theater
6:30 pm June 27th
New Expressive Works (In the WYSE Building), 810 SE Belmont St.
Use building doors located on the South side of the building.
Pakistani Bharatanatyam dancer Amna Mawaz Khan began her dance training at the age of eleven from one of Pakistan’s oldest living dance exponents of the form, Indu Mitha. She has performed worldwide, and has recently run for an elected office in Islamabad, connecting her practice of resistance politics to that of her dancing.

Khan will talk about her experience dancing Indian dances in Pakistan, along with how her dance teacher adjusted Bharatanatyam, which is a South Indian form of classical dance, to suit the Pakistani culture and languages.

Sleeping Beauty, June Taylor’s School of Dance, June 24th at 1:00 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Photo courtesy of June Taylor School of Dance.

Sleeping Beauty
June Taylor’s School of Dance
June 24th at 1:00 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Portland Community College Sylvania Performing Art Center, 12000 Southeast 49th Ave.
With music by Ilyich Tchaikovsky and steps by Marius Petipa, the students of June Taylor’s School of Dance from five to eighteen, will dance the story of Princess Aurora, cursed by the evil Carabosse to prick her finger on a spindle and die on her 16th birthday. Of course good triumphs over evil, and the powerful and righteous fairies intervene, rescuing Aurora from death, and uniting her with her prince.

JTSD students Helia Megowan will be dancing the leading role of Aurora, Sarah Valesano will perform the Lilac Fairy, Michelle Oakman will perform Carabosse, and Lauren Wattenburg will dance the role of the Bluebird. All original Petipa choreography is staged by June Taylor-Dixon, and additional choreography adapted for JTSD’s younger dancers is by June Taylor-Dixon, Rachel Fleming, and Rebecca Hasler.

Cabaret by Roundabout Theatre Company, presented by U.S. Bank Broadway in Portland. June 27-July 2, Keller Auditorium, 222 SW Clay St. Photo courtesy of Roundabout Theatre Company.

Cabaret
Roundabout Theatre Company
Presented by U.S. Bank Broadway in Portland
June 27-July 2
Keller Auditorium, 222 SW Clay St.
In pre-war Germany, as the Nazis gain power, drama unfold between a young writer and Sally Bowles, a singer at the seedy Berlin nightclub called the Kit Kat Club. Nightlife is alluring, but dangerous, and times are uncertain. The Emcee, a ghoulish persona, tantalizes the crowd with his raucous, debauched performers, helping them to forget. In the musical’s final scene, as the Emcee is giving his Auf Wiedersehens, Sally Bowles says, “It’ll all work out, it’s only politics, what’s it got to do with us?” A nod to the society’s blindness towards the Nazi regime, and a relevant critique today.

Upcoming Performances

June
June 29-30, Choreography XX, Oregon Ballet Theatre
June 30, Spectacle Garden 13: The End, Hosted by Ben Martens
June 30-July 1, Improvisation Summit of Portland 2017, Hosted by The Creative Music Guild and Disjecta
July
July 5, ARCOS studio showing, ARCOS Dance
July 6, Éowyn Emerald & Dancers
July 8, Ten Tiny Dances, Beaverton Farmers Market, Directed by Mike Barber
July 14-15, Rantum Skoot, Linda Austin, Gregg Bielemeier, Bob Eisen (NYC), and Sada Naegelin & Leah Wilmoth
July 14-16, Apparatus, by Danielle Ross
July 15, Rush Hour, Heidi Duckler Dance Theater Northwest
July 15, Pretty Creatives Showing, NW Dance Project
July 26, Movement and Flow: Portland Dance Films, Hosted by NW Film Center featuring films by Conrad Kazcor, Fuchsia Lin, Dylan Wilbur Media, Gabriel Shalom, Jackie Davis, and Amy Yang Chiao
July 29, Hafla, Portland Bellydance Guild
August
August 3-5, Galaxy Dance Festival, Hosted by Polaris Dance Theatre
August 11-13, JamBallah Northwest ’17, Hosted by JamBallah NW
August 24-September 6, Portland Dance Film Fest, Directed by Kailee McMurran, Tia Palomino, and Jess Evans
August 24-October 8, Kurios: Cabinet Of Curiosities, Cirque Du Soleil

Liza’s a cabaret, old chum

Triangle's "Liza! Liza! Liza!" offers a triple dose of Minnelli in show-stopping song and story

The stage is on fire with the radiance of millions of sequins and the over-the-top soprano arias, moving into a hint of silvery vibrato, that made Liza Minnelli a star of stage and screen. Triangle Productions’s newest show willkommens, bienvenues the United States premiere of Liza! Liza! Liza!, an intimate portrait of the manic, pixie-haired diva.

Imagine an evening in a small lounge while Liza delivers her hits and shares the story of her life. This alone is the devil giving his come-hither finger. But on stage are not one Ms. Minnelli, not two, but three. We get the young, vivacious, and eager Liza; the middle-aged, accomplished, and sensual Liza; and the older, sadder, but wiser Liza. They all take on her signature bubbly speaking voice with its sexy and breathy laugh, creating a magic blood harmony of a similar woman’s voice as it changes with her years.

The three Lizas, belting 'em out. Triangle Productions photo.

The three Lizas, belting ’em out. Triangle Productions photo.

More than twenty-four of Liza’s songs provide the soundtrack of her train-wreck life. She’s a Hollywood blue-blood, but her life is punctuated by calamity and her overwhelming drive to have the show go on. The play – by Richard Harris, whose other famous work includes The Avengers British television show – approaches her life and art with sensitivity. Liza struggles with her body image, family history of addiction, chaotic love affairs, illness. Forget (if you can) that she’s Liza Minnelli, and her problems are the same ones many women combat. This puts Liza’s feet firmly on the earth, despite her stardom. In an age when celebrity pretends to be goddess-like in its perfection, it’s refreshing to know that some of our heroes can be great creative forces at least partly because of the obstacles they face and overcome.

Continues…

 
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!